Rouge Valley Conservation Centre

 

To donate to the Rouge Valley Conservation Centre click on the button below:

2016 Rouge Valley Eco Exploration Event

Main Sponsor:

2016 Rouge Valley Eco Exploration Supporters

Supporters:

ENTERTAINMENT:

Join us throughout the day for a live music performance by Social Potion. For more information, visit www.socialpotion.ca


FOOD:

Hamburgers, Veggie Burgers, Hot Dogs and drinks will be available for purchase while supplies last.

DATE: Saturday June 4 and Sunday June 5, 2016

TIME: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

LOCATION: Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, 1749 Meadowvale Road (north of Sheppard Ave. E.) in Scarborough

ADMISSION: Suggested donation of $10 per person.
All money donated goes towards the Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, Educational Programs and Events, and LivingRoom Interpretive Space.

PARKING: Parking is available in the Toronto Zoo Parking Lot #4 located next to the Rouge Valley Conservation Centre.
Thank you to the Toronto Zoo for allowing us to use their lot!



GUIDED WALKS:

Please join us for one of our themed Eco Exploration hikes great for all ages!

You must register to participate in these hikes, please sign up by emailing your name, contact information and number of people in your party to events@rvcc.ca or sign up on the day of the event at the welcome booth. Space is limited.

Saturday June 4, 2016:

11 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Myrmecochory (seed dispersal by ants) with Shannon Meadley Dunphy (presentation at Ant booth)

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Butterflies with Tom Mason

1:00 p.m. - 2:00p.m. Milksnakes with Marcus Maddalena

2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Turtles with Chantel Markle (presentation at Turtle booth)

Sunday June 5, 2016:

11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Butterflies with Tom Mason

1:00 p.m. - 2:00p.m. Milksnakes with Marcus Maddalena

2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Turtles with Chantel Markle (presentation at Turtle booth)


Please wear appropriate footwear (hiking shoes or boots, running shoes; no open toed shoes or sandals). Bottle of water, hats, sunscreen and insect repellant with DEET are highly recommended. Please note, there is poison ivy along the trails and the possibility of ticks.



Eco Exploration Booths:

Take a walk along the Vista and Orchard trails and visit one or all of our Eco Exploration Experts.

Join us for this great family event on June 4 & 5! Explore the Rouge Valley and learn about the local ecosystem and its flora and fauna from wildlife experts including Citizen Scientists, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, Royal Ontario Museum and others. Learn about our native fish, insects, plants, geology, amphibians and birds from the experts while taking a stroll through the beautiful Rouge Valley.

Bring your camera and help us photograph our local species as part of our mini Bio Blitz, take part in our Guided Interpretive Hikes and Kids Eco Station Challenge. While you’re here, grab a bite to eat and stay a while to enjoy some great local music performed live by Social Potion (Sat & Sun).

See below for full details or email your questions to events@rvcc.ca

Meet some of our 2016 Flora and Fauna Experts



Melissa Evans, Fish and Mussels

Melissa Evans is a biologist and educator at the Toronto Zoo. She is the Aqua-Links program assistant and helps to restore the population of endangered Atlantic salmon in Lake Ontario with the help of schools across the GTA. Melissa is passionate about teaching students the importance of the keeping the Great Lakes clean and protecting native endangered species in Lake Ontario.


Natasha Gonsalves, Plants

Natasha graduated from Saint Mary's University with a B.Sc degree in Biology and from Sir Sandford Fleming College as Ecosystem Management Technician. Since then she has worked with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) as an Environmental Technician; collecting long-term monitoring data and carrying out field inventories of vegetation communities and flora species according to TRCA's protocols and the Ecological Land Classification System. As a crew leader for Citizen Scientists, Natasha has also conducted fish and benthic macroinvertebrate surveys.


Jonathan Harris, Birds

Jonathan is a Field Biologist at Dillon Consulting. He conducts herbaceous and woody plant surveys, species at risk surveys, ecological land classification, wetland delineation, environmental impact assessments, reporting (EA, EIS, technical memo, SAR screening etc.), site reconnaissance. Previously he worked as a Songbird Research Assistant at the University of Chicago.


David Lawrie, Fish, Mussels, Aquatic Invertebrates

David is currently an Aquatic Biologist with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and a member of the Provincial Redside Dace recovery team representing the TRCA. A graduate of Waterloo and York Universities, he has 17 years experience in the environment field. During this time David has worked in many areas including natural channel re-construction, bio-engineering and restoration, terrestrial and aquatic field surveys, planning development and permit review, and ecological analysis for the development and implementation of resource planning documents including Fisheries and Watershed Management Plans. David is also a Rouge Valley Foundation board member and spearheaded his own non-profit group Citizen Scientists, a volunteer based, aquatic environmental monitoring and education group.


Marcus Maddalena, Milksnakes

Currently working with Parks Canada and the Toronto Zoo to assess the population of Eastern Milksnakes, a species of special concern nationally and within the Greater Toronto Area. The project focuses on the Rouge Valley population of Milksnakes and their movement patterns. With the fragmented state of our urban green spaces, it is important to understand how Milksnakes move through these landscapes to implement effective management strategies. By identifying surrounding populations, we can then examine connectivity and the influence of potential disturbances on habitat selection.


Chantel Markle, Turtles

Chantel is a Ph.D candidate at McMaster University in the department of Biology. Her research focuses on integrating remote sensing, spatial statistics, and ecology to aid in freshwater turtle conservation in Ontario. She is currently working in Georgian Bay and Lake Erie to identify critical habitat use and travel corridors, which are important to sustain turtle populations. These data are being used to develop predictive models which can identify important and necessary areas for conservation. Chantel is looking forward to the EcoExploration event this year to share her passion for turtle conservation and talk about her research. You will also have the opportunity to learn about and experience radio-tracking, a common method used to gather data.


Tom Mason, Butterflies

Tom was the Curator of Invertebrates at the Toronto Zoo and acting Curator of Birds at the Toronto Zoo. He has worked in zoos for over 29 years. 23 years at Toronto Zoo. He has traveled and collected on 5 continents., lead tours for fish and reptile enthusiasts to Costa Rica, worked on three recovery teams for Ontario endangered species. He has bred over 50 species of reptiles and amphibians and worked on conservation projects in Cuba and Costa Rica.


Shannon Meadley Dunphy, Ants

Shannon’s work focuses on seed dispersal by ants, or myrmecochory. In southern Ontario, 30% of forest herbaceous plants have seeds dispersed principally by one ant, Aphaenogaster rudis s.l. Shannon is interested in quantifying the benefits that both plants and ants gain from this mutualism. Her work tries to understand how seed dispersal directly and indirectly benefits an ant colony as a whole. She is also interested in understanding how invasive species disrupt this mutualism by changing the outcome of species interactions. This includes looking at invasive species of ants, plants, and even slugs and looking at differences in seed dispersal patterns between a native and an invasive ant species, and how these differences affect plant fitness and survival.


Jacqueline Miller, Bats and Mammals

Jacqui graduated from the University of Toronto with an MSc. in Anthropology. She is currently a PhD candidate in Zoology and has spent the last several years compiling data on vocal communication and its evolution in rodents.  Jacqui has over a decade of field and laboratory experience, published in several scientific journals, and presented internationally on topics ranging from the molecular systematics to vocal communication in singing mice. Jacqui’s research has taken her from Canada to the Southwestern USA, Mexico, and Central America. She has surveyed small mammals in a variety of habitats locally and abroad, from semi-desert environments to montane tropical cloud forest. Jacqui has a special interest in relationships between behavioural ecology and species diversity. She has been an instructor for several field courses in Latin America and supervised undergraduate research theses, imbuing her passion for biology to many university students. Jacqui is currently affiliated with the Department of Natural History at the Royal Ontario Museum, where she continues her research and participates in several taxonomy projects with ROM curatorial staff.


Tessa Molina and Maria O'Sullivan, Asian Carps

Tessa graduated from Trent University with a B.A. in Biology and Environmental and Resource Studies. Maria graduated from the University of Toronto with a B.Sc, specializing in Biodiversity, Ecology and Evolution and a MEnvSc in Conservation and Biodiversity. They previously worked at a provincial park, educating park goers on the subjects of invasive species, camping and fishing. They now work for the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters as the Asian Carps Community Outreach Liaisons as part of the Asian Carps Campaign. Their goal this summer is to educate the public about Asian carps; four invasive species that are a threat to the Great Lakes. Their booth will have lots of educational materials, as well as fun activities for kids.

 

Chris Robinson, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters, Atlantic Salmon Recovery Program


Sara Ross, Dillon Consulting, Amphibians


Alexandrina Shannon, World Biosphere

Alexandrina is working on the development of the Oak Ridges Moraine, Greenbelt, Rouge Park World biosphere Reserve nomination along with the Rouge Valley Foundation. The Oak Ridges Moraine and Greenbelt (including the Rouge Park) combined cover 418, 920 ha of environmentally significant land including farmland, forests, wetlands, meadows, lakes, and rivers providing homes to thousands of plant and animal species including over 78 Federally and Provincially listed Species at Risk including the Jefferson Salamander, Redside Dace, Eastern Meadowlark, Bobolink and Blanding’s Turtle.

 

The Oak Ridges Moraine and Greenbelt were protected in 2002 and 2005 respectfully but with the added designation of World Biosphere Reserve so much more can be accomplished in these areas. A World Biosphere Reserve designation will help promote sustainable agriculture and provide livelihoods for farmers, increase ecotourism and sustainable tourism, increase awareness and social consciousness for stewardship, biodiversity, and good land management, promote communities to come together and develop programs that further understanding about conservation and sustainability, and can also increase the flow of local, technical and scientific knowledge about conservation.


Saturday June 4


Vista Trail:

Mammals

Milksnakes

Birds

Ants



Orchard Trail:

Fish and Mussels

Atlantic Salmon Recovery

Invasive Species

Frogs

Turtles

World Biosphere

Sunday June 5


Vista Trail:

Mammals

Milksnakes

Birds

Plants



Orchard Trail:

Fish and Mussels

Aquatic Inverts

Atlantic Salmon Recovery

Invasive Species

Frogs

Turtles

World Biosphere